Apps List #1: 6 Light Puzzle Games (Android)

You know what? I don’t usually play games on my phone or computer, but when I do, I would play puzzle games. And these are 6 of my favorite puzzle games for Android.

These puzzles are both light (less than 1 MB) in size and have simple gameplay. I’m sick of games that are huge, have flashy animations, needs internet connection, and has ads.

All but two of these games are open-source, and were discovered on F-Droid repository.

(And this is my first post written using ScribeFire.)

1. Yet Another Tetris (112 kB)

I don’t think that the game itself needs an explanation.
2014_12_23_07.47.05
I’ve been playing this game since I first got an Android phone 2 years ago. I think that compared to just any tetris games available for Android, even the official Tetris game, this version is the best.It has nice graphics and animations, looks great on both small and large screens, comfortable controls, has features like grids and ghosts, even scores and statistics.
Unfortunately, this game has been long gone from the Play Store, but if you have installed 1Mobile market on your phone, you still can download it. I can’t find the apk version anywhere, but I’ve grabbed it from my phone’s /mnt/asec folder and uploaded it into Dropbox.

Developer: Rashid Gaiutdinov

License: Freeware

Requirements: Android 2.1 and up

Download: 1Mobile | APK file (Dropbox)

2. Tower of Hanoi (28 kB)

2014_12_23_14.38.50
This game is based on a mathematical puzzle, where you should move a stack of disks with different sizes along three rods with the rules 1) you only can move one disk at a time, and 2) you can’t stack a larger disk on top of a smaller one.
This is the simplest and smallest Tower of Hanoi game available for Android. It’s also the smallest game in this list. The only thing you can adjust in this game is the screen orientation (the game is better played in landscape mode) and the number of disks (from 3 to 10).
The only downside from this game is that just like playing with a Rubik’s Cube, if you play it frequently enough, it gets easier and possibly less challenging. It’s still a great time-waster, though.

Developer: Johan Mӧller

License: Freeware

Requirements: Android 2.1 and up

Download: Google Play

3. Simon Tatham’s Puzzle Collection (704 kB)

2014_12_23_07.59.03
No list of puzzle games for Android – nope, any platforms – would be complete without mentioning Simon Tatham’s Puzzle Collection. It’s a collection of 38 puzzle games, available for Java, Javascript, Windows, Mac OS, Unix, Linux, and some mobile-based operating systems. I play it in all three of my operating systems (the PortableApps version, the Debian package found on Ubuntu Software Centre, and this version)
stg-1
You will notice many familiar games like Fifteen, Minesweeper, and Sudoku besides many games you possibly have never played, or have played on physical/paper-and-pencil form. Just like the desktop version, each game came with instructions, configurable levels, and the ability to load and save games.
stg-2

Developer: Simon Tatham (original), Chris Boyle (Android)

License: MIT license

Requirements: Android 2.1 and up

Links: Official site | Chris Boyle | Google Play

4. OpenSudoku (219.4 kB)

2014_12_23_15.44.43
The problem with many Sudoku games for Android is to fit the playing grid and the input buttons on the same screen. It seems like they’re created with large screens in mind, which makes the screen consists of 50% grid and 50% input buttons. This makes the grid (especially the pencil marks) too small to see on my 3.15″ phone, thus rendering the game unplayable.
2014_12_26_16.14.23
OpenSudoku fixes this problem by dedicating most of the screen for the grid and uses pop-up buttons as one of its three input types, making it comfortable to play on both large and small screens.
OpenSudoku came with 90 games in three levels. If you want more, you can download and import more games from its Google Code page. The only missing feature from OpenSudoku is the ability to check the entire puzzle for mistakes (it could only notify you of duplicate numbers on a region/row).

Developer: Roman Mašek

License: GNU GPL v3

Requirements: Android 2.1 and up

Links: Google Code | Google Play

5. Core (48 kB)

(Well, this is not a puzzle game. It’s more like a minimalistic arcade game)
2014_12_23_08.14.32
An Android port of Hakim El Hattab’s HTML  game of the same name, which in turn is based on an earlier game called Sinuous. In this game, you should protect a cyan dot on the middle of the screen from the oncoming tiny red dots, which makes it got smaller until it disappeared. The center dot has a white shield around it, which you can use to repel red dots. You can rotate the shield by making circles on the screen.
Oncoming cyan dots would make the center dot bigger, while blue dots would form a barrier around it for a short time.

Developer: Hakim El Hattab (original), Andrey Moiseev (Android)

License: MIT License

Requirements: Android 1.5 and up

Links: Github | Google Play

6. Lexic (120 kB)

2014_12_25_21.13.57
Lexic is a word game where you should create as many words as you can in x minutes (the default is 3 minutes) from a grid of letters, by connecting neighboring letters. You can move horizontally, vertically, and diagonally, but you can only choose letters directly next to you. Lexic has two dictionaries to use: American and British English, with more than 77.000 words. It used to have an online mode, but was removed due to lack of users.
For me, Lexic is frustatingly fun. Frustrating, since I could never find all the available words on a grid. When the time was up, Lexic would show you all the words you’ve found and missed (and how to form them) and I would think, ‘How could I miss that one?’
(Also, did you know that the jumbled letters on Lexic’s main screen (behind the title) changes every time you open it?)

Developer: Rev. Johnny Healey

License: GNU GPL v3

Requirements: Android 1.6 and up

Links: Google Code | Google Play

That’s all for now. Those are not the only games I like and enjoy playing on Android. I’m currently playing OpenSudoku and Shortyz, a great crossword app.

The next article would be my first Linux app review.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Apps List #1: 6 Light Puzzle Games (Android)

  1. Oh my Gosh… Thank you sooo so so much for posting this! You have no idea how much this has helped me! I love the basic stuff! All the applications out there are massive in size and sometimes make my device warm, slow, and takes up all my space. I thank you so much for this! I can now delete 4 apps and download 2 and have the same thing, plus more! It will save me so much space (seeing how my phone is running very low on space due to the flashy basic games) this is a life saver!!! Thank you again so very much!!! 🙏😁😁😁🙏💃🙌🙌🙌👍👌👏👏✊✌👋

      1. I do love that one! There are a lot of pretty neat little games. In still learning some of them. I just love it! Thank you so much! I was able to delete 5 apps actually. The games I had are all in one now! It’s great! 😁😂😂😃 thank you thank you! 💖

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s